americanroads:

Abandoned movie theater
1154 Main St. Hellertown, PA 18055

Timestamp: 1410721938

americanroads:

Abandoned movie theater
1154 Main St. Hellertown, PA 18055

dailydoseoftexas:

West Texas country road

by Chris Newby

Timestamp: 1410721936

dailydoseoftexas:

West Texas country road

by Chris Newby

maryhaines:

"They´re both very cool, they´re very sophisticated, they´re very low key about it, they have a lot of wit, a lot of charm. But he is the master of the double entendre. He is the master of clever line delivery, that seems to be tossed casually over his shoulder. No one can handle him on screen - except Myrna Loy and puncture his balloon."

Jeanine Basinger, film historian

(via archiegrants)

Timestamp: 1410721923

maryhaines:

"They´re both very cool, they´re very sophisticated, they´re very low key about it, they have a lot of wit, a lot of charm. But he is the master of the double entendre. He is the master of clever line delivery, that seems to be tossed casually over his shoulder. No one can handle him on screen - except Myrna Loy and puncture his balloon."

Jeanine Basinger, film historian

(via archiegrants)

wonka51:

clara2222:

"This is one of those things that makes me think you actors are very good. No, it’s just the way that you actually have to do it. You know, you’ve got 40 people around you in a room, guys with microphones and everything, and suddenly you’ve got to do it for real.

But she does it so…She’s completely brilliant. It’s not just that she cries…

I clearly didn’t direct her at all this day, she just did it all herself.”

Richard Curtis.  DVD Audio commentary of Love Actually. 

if you don’t cry when you watch that scene, check your pulse

(via lostinthecircus)

Timestamp: 1410721431

wonka51:

clara2222:

"This is one of those things that makes me think you actors are very good. No, it’s just the way that you actually have to do it. You know, you’ve got 40 people around you in a room, guys with microphones and everything, and suddenly you’ve got to do it for real.

But she does it so…She’s completely brilliant. It’s not just that she cries…

I clearly didn’t direct her at all this day, she just did it all herself.”

Richard Curtis.  DVD Audio commentary of Love Actually. 

if you don’t cry when you watch that scene, check your pulse

(via lostinthecircus)

lvmrsmn:

This is beautiful.

(Source: mrlapadite, via fizzlybubbles)

Timestamp: 1410284210

lvmrsmn:

This is beautiful.

(Source: mrlapadite, via fizzlybubbles)

americanroads:

Pie contest
Allentown Fairgrounds, 302 N 17th St. Allentown, PA 18104

Timestamp: 1410033199

americanroads:

Pie contest
Allentown Fairgrounds, 302 N 17th St. Allentown, PA 18104

ronaldcolmans:

William Powell listening very carefully to Myrna Loy in Double Wedding (1937)

(via archiegrants)

Timestamp: 1409551661

ronaldcolmans:

William Powell listening very carefully to Myrna Loy in Double Wedding (1937)

(via archiegrants)

20 plays
  • Trackname:

    End of the Summer
  • Artist:

    Dar Williams
  • Album:

    End of the Summer

inessentialhouses:

Happy 116th Birthday, Fredric March
(August 31, 1897 - April 14, 1975)

He began as the Depression ideal: a gilded leading man, booze-soaked and brilliantined, with the sort of profile that seems like it was carved by the movie gods just to be photographed against an art deco film set. He was suave, with a voice that managed to be both melodious and gritty; he was wry, able to communicate a kind of furtive, perceptive humour with little more than an eyebrow raised just so. He was the Rake, the Reporter, the Drunkard, the Monster, the Playwright, the Everyman — languishing in expensive penthouses for the entertainment of audiences languishing on breadlines, and doing it very, very well.

Over the course of a prolific career spanning decades, he went on to become a distinguished character actor with two Academy Awards under his belt and a long resume rich with diverse performances. Here is a man who could take almost any role and weave into it a depth of feeling that’s fascinating to watch. He played his characters with respect and humanity, instilling in them a sense of realism that could elevate even the most potentially generic tropes into another stratosphere of authenticity — the fallen movie idol, the veteran readapting to civilian life — vibrant and alive on screen.

I scoured the internet for a quote that could convey the importance of this man and his work in a manner befitting that importance, but I found nothing. The disappointing truth is that he’s not remembered the way he deserves to be; if the word “underrated” applies to anyone, it’s Fredric March. He was outrageously talented, a true master of his craft — if you haven’t seen him act, change that. There’s a March film for everyone: the provocative pre-code comedy Design for Living, the cautionary Hollywood fairy-tale-gone-wrong A Star Is Born, the wacky screwball hijinks of Nothing Sacred, the gaslit horror of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the heartrending (and heartwarming) The Best Years of Our Lives, the still-relevant courtroom drama Inherit the Wind…some of the best movies you’ll ever see, starring one of the greatest actors you’ll ever have the pleasure to adore.

(via justlittleclassicfilmthings)

Timestamp: 1409501374

inessentialhouses:

Happy 116th Birthday, Fredric March
(August 31, 1897 - April 14, 1975)

He began as the Depression ideal: a gilded leading man, booze-soaked and brilliantined, with the sort of profile that seems like it was carved by the movie gods just to be photographed against an art deco film set. He was suave, with a voice that managed to be both melodious and gritty; he was wry, able to communicate a kind of furtive, perceptive humour with little more than an eyebrow raised just so. He was the Rake, the Reporter, the Drunkard, the Monster, the Playwright, the Everyman — languishing in expensive penthouses for the entertainment of audiences languishing on breadlines, and doing it very, very well.

Over the course of a prolific career spanning decades, he went on to become a distinguished character actor with two Academy Awards under his belt and a long resume rich with diverse performances. Here is a man who could take almost any role and weave into it a depth of feeling that’s fascinating to watch. He played his characters with respect and humanity, instilling in them a sense of realism that could elevate even the most potentially generic tropes into another stratosphere of authenticity — the fallen movie idol, the veteran readapting to civilian life — vibrant and alive on screen.

I scoured the internet for a quote that could convey the importance of this man and his work in a manner befitting that importance, but I found nothing. The disappointing truth is that he’s not remembered the way he deserves to be; if the word “underrated” applies to anyone, it’s Fredric March. He was outrageously talented, a true master of his craft — if you haven’t seen him act, change that. There’s a March film for everyone: the provocative pre-code comedy Design for Living, the cautionary Hollywood fairy-tale-gone-wrong A Star Is Born, the wacky screwball hijinks of Nothing Sacred, the gaslit horror of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the heartrending (and heartwarming) The Best Years of Our Lives, the still-relevant courtroom drama Inherit the Wind…some of the best movies you’ll ever see, starring one of the greatest actors you’ll ever have the pleasure to adore.

(via justlittleclassicfilmthings)

texasmonthly:

Y’all better make this last weekend of summer count. #myfavetexas #Repost from @danafelthauser “You cannot always wait for the perfect time, sometimes you must dare to jump.” #cliffjump at #jacobswell in the #texashillcountry (at Texas Monthly)

Timestamp: 1409467131

texasmonthly:

Y’all better make this last weekend of summer count. #myfavetexas #Repost from @danafelthauser “You cannot always wait for the perfect time, sometimes you must dare to jump.” #cliffjump at #jacobswell in the #texashillcountry (at Texas Monthly)